You are here

Information Papers

9 results for Information paper, Energy and Pork
Energy-efficient farm lighting

Energy-efficient farm lighting

Upgrading farm lighting equipment can achieve energy savings for relatively low investment and should be considered by most farm businesses. Reductions in lighting energy use of 82 percent can be made. Which specific solution best suit your needs will depends on a number of factors. Generally, retrofitting requires less up-front capital and is simpler, but installing a new system is more cost-effective in buildings that contain older equipment. Full replacement of your lighting can also be economical where improvements in technology have led to price reductions.
Published 13th Jun 2014
Insulating farm buildings

Insulating farm buildings

Insulation can result in efficiency gains of between 20 and 30 percent in some farm buildings, and is integral to the design of modern intensive animal production facilities. Insulation can be applied in roofs, walls and floors, and is best incorporated at the construction stage due to the cost and complexity of retrofitting. A wide range of products can be effective, potentially, in agricultural applications. Selecting materials and calculating your return on investment depends on assessing the specific requirements of your buildings and production system.
Published 16th Jun 2014
Reflective roofs and energy efficiency

Reflective roofs and energy efficiency

Reflective roof coatings can reduce the temperature inside farm facilities by up to 15 percent, reducing the energy demand of heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems. Savings are most significant where there was previously limited or no ceiling insulation in place. When commissioning new facilities or undertaking maintenance of existing ones, the additional cost of adding reflective coating to roofs is likely to be warranted.
Published 16th Jun 2014
Power factor correction

Power factor correction

Some farmers are unaware that their electricity bills can be reduced by improving the ‘power factor’ (PF) of their facilities. A poor power factor is analogous to a beer with too much head, when the head represents wasted energy. Networks penalise facilities with poor PFs by increasing ‘demand’ (or ‘capacity’) charges. Installing power factor correction devices can help ensure that on-farm electrical equipment uses the voltage provided by the network efficiently and that penalties are not applied as a result of the facility making unpredictable demands on the system.
Published 16th Jun 2014
Solar hot water

Solar hot water

Solar hot water works well in buildings that have significant roof area on which to locate solar collectors. A solar hot water system should provide between 40 and 60 percent of your hot water needs. Solar hot water systems come with electric or gas boosters to provide the remainder of your hot water needs. Solar hot water systems use solar collectors – either solar panels or evacuated tubes – which absorb energy from the sun to heat water. The heated water is then stored in an insulated tank until you need it. Typical applications are in dairies, piggeries and worker accommodation.
Published 16th Jun 2014
Voltage optimisation units

Voltage optimisation units

Voltage optimisation can achieve energy savings of between five and 20 percent in situations where mains voltage is higher than is needed by farm equipment. In addition to enabling energy savings, voltage optimisation units protect electrical devices from variation – surges or drops – in mains voltage. Purchasing considerations include the type of unit and the presence of electronic devices in the circuit. The installed cost of a VO unit typically ranges between $150/kVA and $300/kVA.
Published 16th Jun 2014
Solar photovoltaic energy on farm

Solar photovoltaic energy on farm

Solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has wide application in rural Australia. Although the electricity generated by photovoltaic panels is intermittent, PV systems can help reduce electricity consumption from the network and provide other benefits such as reduced demand charges. Standalone systems using batteries or direct loads can also be used to power equipment, such as irrigation pumps, that are far from network connection points. Although solar PV systems can be scaled to provide all the electrical energy a farm requires, return on investment and needs analyses are essential to ensure farmers select systems of the proper type and size.
Published 23rd Jun 2014
Energy purchasing- Electricity

Energy purchasing- Electricity

Research by NSW Farmers indicates that many farmers have not negotiated the best possible electricity contracts for their operations. Electricity bills are comprised of various charges, some of which are negotiable. The timing of going to market and taking a professional approach to contract development are also significant factors. Effective contract negotiation depends on acquiring a sound working knowledge of electricity market dynamics, the factors that determine pricing, and the terms retailers are likely to accept for a given property and time period.
Published 24th Jun 2014
Energy purchasing- liquid fuels

Energy purchasing- liquid fuels

The purchasing process is central to efficient use of diesel and other liquid fuels. Factors influencing liquid-fuel-purchasing decisions include storage life, potential fuel losses, and the legislative and financial implications of large-scale on-site storage. Fresh fuel is more energy-efficient than aged fuel, and planning the delivery of fuel around peak demand is key to effective fuel management. There are a number of buying strategies that can help you to negotiate the best price, avoid wastage and maximise return on fuel investment.
Published 26th Jun 2014
Error | AgInnovators

Error

The website encountered an unexpected error. Please try again later.