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7 results for Information paper, Energy and Farm vehicles
Adaptive driving- the skill factor in fuel efficiency

Adaptive driving- the skill factor in fuel efficiency

Driver skill is a central element in achieving farm fuel efficiency. Modern diesel-engine tractors typically maximise their efficiency when operated within 60 to 80 percent of their rated power output. Maintaining this range requires skill and attention from the operator. Key factors in achieving efficient driving practices on farm are: driver skill, awareness and motivation; feedback systems provided by the machinery; and logging and analysing fuel consumption regularly. Fuel savings greater than 20 percent can be achieved in some situations.
Published 17th Jun 2014
Estimating tractor power needs

Estimating tractor power needs

This information paper provides guidance and calculation tools to enable you to determine the appropriate power (in kW or horsepower) that your field operations will require. It will allow you to determine the size of the tractor that best suits your needs without being under- or over-powered. This is of critical importance, as a machine that’s not well matched for the tasks it will perform is likely to operate inefficiently. This can lead to fuel waste or early breakdown.
Published 17th Jun 2014
Monitoring wheel slip to achieve fuel efficiency

Monitoring wheel slip to achieve fuel efficiency

Wheel slip is a key indicator of efficient tractor set-up and operation. The level of wheel slip serves as a proxy to indicate whether the right combination of tyre pressures, tractor weight (ballast) and tractor operating speed are resulting in the correct traction required to perform efficiently and save fuel. Many operators are misinformed as to the appropriate levels of slip.
Published 17th Jun 2014
Purchasing a fuel-efficient tractor

Purchasing a fuel-efficient tractor

If chosen correctly, modern tractors can deliver significant energy savings and operational efficiencies over earlier machinery. Tractors are increasingly specialised and complex, making it essential to match their features to specific farming tasks and environments. Below, fuel-efficiency factors are discussed in relation to usage requirements, dealer support, engine performance, chassis configuration, linkages and power take-offs, and wheel, tyre and ballasting features.
Published 17th Jun 2014
Tractor ballasting

Tractor ballasting

Often, Australian tractors are overballasted. Correctly setting ballast to match a tractor’s main duties can result in fuel savings of five to eight percent. Establishing correct ballast involves identifying goal weights for your main operations and measuring the actual weights at each axle, ideally while the equipment is mounted. Once ballast has been set in the right ball park, further adjustment may be unnecessary, since efficient traction can be achieved simply by adjusting tyre pressure. Taking a common-sense approach minimises the need for ballast changes but ensures that gross ballasting errors are avoided.
Published 17th Jun 2014
Tractor tyre selection

Tractor tyre selection

Tractor tyre specification is a key element in achieving fuel efficiency. Factors that need to be considered include tread, diameter, width, rim size, load indexes, single/double/triple arrangements and typical operating speeds. Unsuitable tyres may make it difficult or impossible to implement other fuel-efficiency measures. Larger tyres spread the weight and enable operation at lower and at a wider range of pressures.
Published 18th Jun 2014
Tyre pressure and fuel efficiency

Tyre pressure and fuel efficiency

Managing tyre pressure is an essential means of achieving fuel efficiency in tractors and other heavy farm machinery. Fuel savings of five to 15 per cent can be made by correctly adjusting tyre pressure to match operating conditions. The general rule is lower pressure in the paddock and higher pressure on the road. Adjusting tyre pressure for paddock work helps to optimise traction and minimise soil compaction. Tools to facilitate tyre pressure management include wireless monitors and central tyre inflation systems.
Published 20th Jun 2014
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